Americans Are More Stressed Than Ever - & Yes, The Election Is To Blame

Americans Are More Stressed Than Ever - & Yes, The Election Is To Blame

Americans Are More Stressed Than Ever - & Yes, The Election Is To Blame

While the August 2016 poll marked the first time that politics-related questions were included in the Stress In America survey, the new poll in January showed that politics was now a major source of stress for Americans.

According to a new survey by the American Psychological Association (APA), 66 percent of respondents report feeling increasingly stressed out by the current political climate and prospects for the nation's future.

However, 59 percent of Republicans surveyed said the future of the nation was a source of stress. While some believed anxiety levels would decrease after the election, once the campaigning wound down, it seems to be steadily moving in the opposite direction.

Between the 2016 survey and January's follow up, the average reported stress level rose from 4.8 to 5.1, on a scale where 1 means little to no stress and 10 means maximum stress.

Carli Lloyd to leave NWSL on deal with Manchester City
Houston Dash coach Randy Waldrum said that Lloyd informed him at the weekend about the opportunity to play for Man City. Manchester City is the defending champion of the FA Women's Super League.

It's a boy! Meet American Girl's newest doll
The news doesn't come as much of a surprise to those who have heard rumors about the brand's first boy doll over the past year. The 18-inch figures sell for $115 each or about $140 for the doll, a collection of accessories and the doll's book.

Burger King Shines As Restaurant Brands Int'l Earnings Beat The Street
Royal Bank of Canada boosted its stake in shares of Restaurant Brands International by 22.6% in the second quarter. The Company operates more than 18000 restaurants operating in 100 countries under its two distinct brands.

Americans' opinions on the election outcome were divided along partisan lines. In the APA's most recent survey, politics jumped up on the list: Fifty-seven percent of people experienced stress thinking about the political climate of the country, and 49 percent were stressed out about the election's outcome.

Stress is not unfamiliar to Americans, but typically it is focused around work and money. In fact almost three of every four Democrats, 72 percent, said that Trump was causing them significant stress. Minority groups, millennials, those living in urban areas, and those with a college education had higher levels of stress about the election, which is unsurprising since those demographics tend to lean left politically.

"A third of Americans have reported specific symptoms such as headaches (34 percent), feeling overwhelmed (33 percent), feeling nervous or anxious (33 percent) or feeling depressed or sad (32 percent)", the study reads.

Wright suggests the best way to ease stress related to what's happening in Washington is to disentangle yourself from the minute-by-minute deluge of negative news. "It can make existing health problems worse, and even cause disease, either because of changes in the body or bad habits people develop to cope with stress". "So we try to seek out ways to control it, which is to be informed". She asserted that keeping up with the headlines at night will only "get you riled up again when you should be prioritizing going to sleep, winding down, preparing for the next day. burnout isn't going to help anybody". "People think, if I choose to cope or do something for myself, I'm saying what's happening isn't a big deal".

Related news