You'll now get fewer annoying review prompts on your iPhone and iPad

You'll now get fewer annoying review prompts on your iPhone and iPad

You'll now get fewer annoying review prompts on your iPhone and iPad

Apps are the beating heart of our smartphones.

Apple won't allow third-party apps to ask you to leave the app altogether, but instead will offer an alternative that allows you to give it a star rating without having to leave the app you're using. The updated App Store rules reveal the hard restrictions led by Apple on the appearance of app review prompts and the number of time the users sees them. The change is just part of a slew of changes that are being introduced by the company to its app store. The changes were first spotted by 9to5Mac.

Coombs goes on to say that users will always be given the choice between "Never, When in Use and Always" when the app is first used, so you can have your Uber and uh, eat it too.

You'll now get fewer annoying review prompts on your iPhone and iPad
You'll now get fewer annoying review prompts on your iPhone and iPad

According to new rules, developers can not display the app review prompts whenever they wish too, instead now they have to follow 2 important points before doing so. The rating prompt is mandatory now which will help users to get rid of the annoying prompts. At the time, developers were allowed to continue using any custom review prompts they had previously implemented, with the warning that such permission would eventually be revoked. Furthermore, the user can completely disable the prompts by tapping the iOS Settings app and disabling them.

Analysts say that by making tipping an "in-app purchase", Apple is aiming to make more money out of Chinese users. It may even make people more interested in leaving a review, because it can be done without exiting the app and because it means they'll be done with the prompt for good.

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