Facebook wants your nudes to prevent revenge porn

Facebook wants your nudes to prevent revenge porn

Facebook wants your nudes to prevent revenge porn

Once Facebook is notified, they use image-matching technology to prevent anyone from sharing it on their platforms.

When you send your nude photo to Facebook, what exactly happens to it?

Individuals who have shared intimate, nude or sexual images with partners and are anxious that the partner (or ex-partner) might distribute them without their consent can use Messenger to send the images to be "hashed".

Facebook is first trying and testing the technology in Australia where it is partnering with a government agency led by e-safety commissioner, Julia Inman Grant.

It's not known if the new pilot project in Australia will come to Canada or the U.S.

In a bid to eradicate revenge porn from its pages and give potential victims the upper hand, Facebook is asking users to send in nude photos that could be maliciously shared by someone else.

Grant sought to allay concerns of users about what Facebook would do with the photos they upload.

Earlier this year, Facebook implemented a photo-matching tool in the USA to stop sharing of content tagged as revenge porn in the past.

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A recent study found that one in five Australians have been victims of revenge porn.

Facebook is no stranger to revenge porn and explicit content, which is banned on the platform.

Facebook's technology will also work with Instagram.

However, just because something hasn't been stored on disk or on a server doesn't mean that it is inaccessible, Carhart says.

The way it works is simple: You send yourself the image using Messenger, then Facebook converts it into an identifiable code, which it uses to block attempts to upload the same picture to any of its services. The social media company will then put the image through its processing, create a signature - hash - and then using it in future will prevent uploading of any similar images on the social network for that one particular user.

"So if somebody tried to upload that same image, which would have the same digital footprint or hash value, it will be prevented from being uploaded", she claimed. Once that's done, every photo like that one will be unable to be uploaded to Facebook.

In all, 15 percent report receiving threats to post an explicit image an image of them online, and seven percent have actually had such images circulated digitally. Protecting people from revenge porn.

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