Hurricane hits Carolinas, governor warns 'it's going to get worse'

Hurricane hits Carolinas, governor warns 'it's going to get worse'

Hurricane hits Carolinas, governor warns 'it's going to get worse'

According to the NHC forecast at 5 p.m. on September 12, the storm is forecast to slow down near the coast of North and SC before it passes over the states and into Georgia. Mandatory evacuation orders have been placed for millions of people along the coast with more to possibly come as the path of the storm becomes more apparent.

Teddie Davis goes to check on one of the town's signature bears that was toppled by Hurricane Florence in downtown New Bern, N.C., on Friday.

Blowing ashore with howling 90 miles per hour winds, Florence splintered buildings, trapped hundreds of people and swamped entire communities along the Carolina coast Friday in what could be just the opening act in a watery, two-part, slow-motion disaster.

Hurricane Florence is moving closer to the coast of North and SC, where it is expected to bring a life-threatening storm surge, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said on Thursday. Cloud cover that could encompass multiple states.

The cone of probability for Hurricane Florence as of 11:00 p.m. EDT, Sept. 12, 2018.

Names are only retired "if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate", according to the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration website.

Some predictions are calling for Florence to dump as much as 10 trillion gallons of rain on the region. She says it had not run out at any of its 27 locations in Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia. But it could have been worse: Labor Day marked the end of the peak tourism season in the Outer Banks of North Carolina and other coastal getaways.

Dozens of explosions near Boston, multiple injuries and hundreds evacuated
A middle school in North Andover and a senior center in Andover were set up for evacuees, according to state police. Lawrence General Hospital said it was treating 10 victims, including at least one in critical condition .

Hurricane Florence makes landfall in US North Carolina coast
The storm surge is going to be potentially life-threatening for some areas along the USA coastline. It's about 90 miles northeast of Wrightsville Beach, where Florence made landfall at 7:15 a.m.

Hurricane Florence Is a 'No-Kidding Nightmare' in These New Astronaut Photos
Arnold also captured hurricanes Isaac and Helene lining up behind Florence in the Atlantic. Satellites orbiting Earth have also been keeping tabs on Florence from above.

The wide storm has weakened to a Category 2 hurricane and forecasters expect top winds to drop more as it nears the shore, but they're sharing a giant dose of uncertainty. He says: "If Mama and Grandma are going, then a lot of people are leaving". Surges could reach 9' to 13' on the southeast North Carolina coast between Cape Fear and Cape Lookout, including the Pamlico and Albemarle sounds and their rivers, and 6' to 9' on the adjacent stretches of coast.

In addition, the threat of storm surges looms for areas in the path of the storm, meaning life-threatening inundation from rising water moving inland is possible.

Utility crews worked to restore electricity.

Florence could threaten the largest rainfall event in US history, Hurricane Harvey, the 2017 whirlwind that settled over Texas and dropped more than 60 inches of rain, turning roadways into rivers, destroying homes and buildings and killing almost 90 people.

Georgia Governor Nathan Deal, concerned the storm would bring its devastation south, issued an emergency declaration for all 159 counties in his state. North Carolina's Duplin and Sampson counties, just inland, sell more hogs and pigs than anywhere else in America.

"It was pitch black and I was just scared out of my mind", said Tracy Singleton, who with her family later drove through torrential rain and high winds from her home near New Bern to a hotel some 80 miles (130 km) away.

Aside from safety concerns, Atlantic Coast Conference schools face scheduling obstacles, monetary implications and bowl considerations.

Related news